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3rd BUCHAREST COLLOQUIUM IN EARLY MODERN SCIENCE

Creative Experiments: Heuristic and Exploratory Experimentation in Early Modern Science

24-25 March 2012
Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest

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BUCHAREST-PRINCETON SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY

*12th Edition*

Organized by the Research Centre for the Foundations of Modern Thought (FME), University of Bucharest in collaboration with the Philosophy Department at Princeton University

29 June - 4 July 2012, Bran, Transylvania

THE BATTLE FOR SCIENTIA IN THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

The early modern period was an era of intellectual ferment, old ideas against new, and new ideas against new. Many of the disagreements were over substantive matters: are there indivisible atoms? is there a vacuum? is there anything in the world over and above body? But much of the disagreement was over matters of method and epistemology: what the proper goal of inquiry is and how it should be conducted. Some, like Descartes, favored a newly retooled version of Aristotelian scientia. Others, like Bacon, saw historia as fundamental. Others, like Galileo, Huygens, and later Newton saw mathematics as central. Others, like the members of the Royal Society of London saw the future in the experimental philosophy. Others focused on notions like sapientia or religio. These debates led to lively exchanges, in letters, in documents like theObjections and Replies to Descartes' Meditations, in pamphlet wars, and eventually in journal articles. This is the theme of this year's Bucharest-Princeton seminar: the lively world of disputation over the aims, goals, and methods of inquiry in philosophy and science taken broadly, investigated through the correspondence, debates, objections and replies that animated the intellectual scene of early modern Europe.

The Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy isan international annual meeting of scholars interested in variousaspects of early modern thought. The aim of the seminar is to create astimulating environment for discussing papers and ideas. It includesworkshops in the morning and presentations of papers in the afternoon, where participants can present work in progress. While the morning sessions will focus on the theme of 'The Battle for Scientia', the afternoon sessions seek to give participants an opportunity to discuss their own special interests with an open and sympathetic audience of students and scholars with broad interests in early modern thought. Throughout we try to maintain a balance between the high scholarly level and theinformal friendly spirit of a colloquium.

The Seminar will take place in Bran, a mountain small resort near Brasov, in Transylvania. It will be hosted in a small, friendly Bed and Breakfast(single or double rooms). The participation fee is 150 EUR for facultyand 70 EUR for students (covering accommodation with breakfast). Weinvite applications for contributions (from researchers) and forattendance (from students). If you want to contribute a paper, please send a CV and a one-page abstract, and if you want to attend, a CV and aletter of intent -by April 27 - to Dana Jalobeanu (dana.jalobeanu@celfis.ro), Vlad Alexandrescu (valexandrescu@gmail.com), and Daniel Garber (dgarber@princeton.edu ).

For more infromation about the early editions of Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy see

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The 3rd Edition of Bucharest Graduate Conference

March 22-23,2011, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Bucharest, Romania

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BUCHAREST-PRINCETON SEMINAR IN EARLY MODERN PHILOSOPHY

*11th Edition*

Organized by the Research Centre for the Foundations of Modern Thought (FME), University of Bucharest in collaboration with the Philosophy Department at Princeton University

2 - 8 July 2011, Bran, Transylvania

We are happy to announce the 11th edition of the annual Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy. The Seminar gathers together scholars interested in various aspects of early modern thought. Its aim is to create a stimulating environment for discussing papers and ideas.

Traditionally, the seminar has two components: morning workshops and afternoon discussions of work-in-progress. The languages of the seminar are English and French.

This year, the theme will be: Collaborative aspects of early modern thought: philosophical correspondence and the Republic of Letters

Invited speakers include: Igor Agostini (Lecce), Daniel Garber (Princeton), Sarah Hutton(Aberystwyth), Delphine Kolesnik (Lyon), Koen Vermeir (Paris).

The Seminar will take place in Bran, a small resort near Brasov, in Transylvania. It will be hosted in a small, friendly Bed and Breakfast (single or double rooms). The participation fee is 150 EUR for faculty and 70 EUR for students (covering accommodation with breakfast).

We invite applications for contributions (from researchers) and for attendance (from students). If you want to contribute a paper, please send a CV and a 1 page abstract and if you want to attend a CV and a letter of intent -- by April 27 -- to Dana Jalobeanu dana.jalobeanu@celfis.ro and Vlad Alexandrescu,valexandrescu@gmail.com

 

For more infromation about the early editions of Bucharest-Princeton Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy see

the next page

11th International Society for Intellectual History Conference.
University of Bucharest

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS: Passionate Minds. Knowledge and the Emotions in Intellectual History

May 26-28, 2011

The centrality of the emotions in all areas of human thought, action and expression has lately begun to be recognized and investigated with increasing interest within a variety of disciplines, from cognitive science and the philosophy of emotions to literary and anthropological studies. One central insight of such explorations is that the view of the separation and even opposition between cognition and affectivity is an unjust representation of the complexity of the life of both individuals and communities. Intellectual historians have also become sensitive to the issue and are in fact in a privileged position to bring to the fore the variety and richness of the approaches to the interplay of knowledge and the emotions in the history of thought.

This conference aims to address the topic of the interplay of emotions and cognition as it bears on historical views of epistemology, logic, psychology, theology, medicine, moral philosophy or aesthetics, on approaches to education and the transmission of knowledge, as well as on the dynamics of intellectual communities. We invite panels and individual papers that address any aspect of this theme with reference to any historical period, as well as relevant methodological and historiographic questions. There will also be general sessions devoted to other proposed intellectual historical topics.

Please send your panel proposals and paper abstracts by 15 December 2010 to the conference organizers: Dana Jalobeanu, dana.jalobeanu@celfis.ro and Sorana Corneanu, soranamihaela.corneanu@g.unibuc.ro. For more info see the web-page of the conference at http://www.history.ox.ac.uk/isih/?page_id=38 .

Participation fee: 90 EUR for faculty and 60 EUR for students and unemployed members.

 

The 2nd Edition of Bucharest Graduate Conference

March 7-8,2011, University of Bucharest, Romania

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Francis Bacon and the Early Modern Reconfiguration of Natural History

Second Workshop of the ERC Starting Grant MOM

New Europe College, Bucharest

4-5 March 2011

Oragnizatori: Dana Jalobeanu si Sorana Corneanu

Participants: Daniel Andersson (University of Oxford), Peter Anstey (University of Otago), Sorana Corneanu (University of Bucharest), Benedino Gemelli (Italy), Laura Georgescu (University of Bucharest), Guido Giglioni (The Warburg Institute), Madalina Giurgea (University of Bucharest), Dana Jalobeanu (University of Bucharest), James Lancaster (The Warburg Institute), Doina Cristina Rusu (University of Bucharest), Ian G. Stewart (University of Kings College, Halifax).

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Dana

Dana Jalobeanu and Peter Anstey (eds.): Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Nature: Descartes and Beyond (Routledge Studies in Seventeenth Century Philosophy)

This volume explores the themes of vanishing matter, matter and the laws of nature, the qualities of matter, and the diversity of the debates about matter in the early modern period. Chapters are unified by a number of interlocking themes which together enable some of the broader contours of the philosophy of matter to be charted in new ways. Part I concerns Cartesian Matter; Part II covers Matter, Mechanism and Medicine; Part III covers Matter and the Laws of Motion; and Part IV covers Leibniz and Hume. Bringing together some of the world’s leading scholars of early modern philosophy, as well as some exciting new researchers, Vanishing Matter and the Laws of Motion stakes out new territory that all serious scholars of early modern philosophy and science will want to traverse.